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IPF 2021

19th International Prostate Forum (IPF 2021) will be held in Sanliurfa on 3-5 September 2021 in collaboration with the 11th Eurasian Urooncology Congress.

GOBEKLITEPE

THE TEMPLE THAT CHANGED THE TIMELINE OF CIVILIZATION: THE STARTING POINT IN HISTORY

Göbeklitepe, which is not used as a settlement and serves only as a temple, entered the UNESCO World Heritage List in 2018 with its amazing monumental architecture. Year 2019 was announced as “2109 Göbeklitepe Year” in Turkey. Even though a small part of Göbeklitepe has been excavated, it still has changed the timeline of civilization with its history of about 12 thousand years. Göbeklitepe, considered as the oldest and largest ritual site of the world, proved the effect of religious belief on the transition to a settled life.

Although a limited portion of this prehistoric settlement was excavated in the Harran Plain, its unusual findings have changed some previous findings on the Neolithic Age. The excavations at Göbeklitepe near Örencik village of Sanlıurfa city were started and carried out by the German archaeologist Prof. Dr. Klaus Schmidt and it lasted 20 years until his death in 2014.

Göbeklitepe has contributed a great deal to our understanding of hunter-gatherer life, animal husbandry, agriculture and livestock migration, sacred architecture and the birth of art. It was abandoned after it continued to be present around 8000 B.C and it was not used for other or similar purposes.

THE OLDEST RELIGIOUS SITE IN THE WORLD

The most interesting findings at Göbeklitepe are the t-shaped monolithic pillars which can reach 6 meters in length and 40 tons in weight. Even though six of these pillars were excavated, geomagnetic measurements found there are round 20 pillars in total. These mysterious pillars were lined in a circular plan with stone walls in between. The pillars make up a round or oval enclosed space surrounding a pair of big pillars in the center of the structure.

Most of the pillars have human, animal or abstract symbols. In addition to these oldest reliefs carved into the stone, three-dimensional animal reliefs are also found. The pillars with hand, arm and finger motifs on its body is interpreted as human statues. From the welcome area the excavation site is reached in one minute by shuttles. The animation and information in the entrance are the kind that can’t be missed. The excavation area, which is divided into A, B, C and D, is surrounded by a walking excursion route and its top is closed.

Credit: https://muze.gov.tr/muze-detay?SectionId=SGT01&DistId=SGT

SANLIURFA

About 180 kilometers (110 miles) west of Kiziltepe, in South Eastern Anatolian region, lies the venerably old towns of Sanliurfa. According to both the Bible and Quran it is the birthplace of Abraham before his migration to Canaan, now Palestine. Local Muslim legend differs from that of the other great monotheistic faiths by the intervention of one vicious and cruel King Nimrod who had Abraham launched from a catapult from the city’s citadel to fall into a pile of burning wood. Happily, God intervened and turned the fire to water and the faggots to fish. Today the visitor to the town can visit the mosque complex surrounding Abraham’s Cave and The Pool of Sacred Fish (Balikligöl) around it. The cruel ruler’s giant slingshot is represented by two Corinthian columns still standing atop the citadel.

This is an Anatolian city which has figured in all the religions of the Book. Old Testament prophets such as Jethro (Hz. Suayp), Job (Hz. Eyup), Elijah (Hz. Elyasa) and Abraham (Hz. Ibrahim) lived in this city which in ancient times known as Edessa. Also, Moses (Hz. Musa) lived in the region for seven years working as a shepherd before returning to Egypt with his staff. It was in Sanliurfa that early Christians were first permitted to worship freely and where the first churches were constructed openly. Pagan temples were converted to synagogues, synagogues to churches and churches to mosques, resulting in a uniquely eclectic architecture.

The city’s history is far more complex than mere legendary myths. Known to the ancient Greeks as Orrhoe or Osrhoe, the famous Seleucus Nicator of Antioch, first established the capital of his eastern Hellenistic realm here, populating it with Macedonian veterans who preferred to call it Edessa after their native province. Urfa remained an important garrison town into Roman times and was one of the first centers of the early church, but one given over to the monophysite heresy.

It was at Edessa that the great scientific works of late antiquity were translated with commentaries into Syriac/Aramaic, from whence they made their way into Arabic after the Muslim conquest, only to find their way back to the west following the re-conquest of the city by the Byzantines and then the Crusaders. Under Baldwin I it became the first of several Crusader states in the Middle East.

About 180 kilometers (110 miles) west of Kiziltepe, in South Eastern Anatolian region, lies the venerably old towns of Sanliurfa. According to both the Bible and Quran it is the birthplace of Abraham before his migration to Canaan, now Palestine. Local Muslim legend differs from that of the other great monotheistic faiths by the intervention of one vicious and cruel King Nimrod who had Abraham launched from a catapult from the city’s citadel to fall into a pile of burning wood. Happily, God intervened and turned the fire to water and the faggots to fish. Today the visitor to the town can visit the mosque complex surrounding Abraham’s Cave and The Pool of Sacred Fish (Balikligöl) around it. The cruel ruler’s giant slingshot is represented by two Corinthian columns still standing atop the citadel.

This is an Anatolian city which has figured in all the religions of the Book. Old Testament prophets such as Jethro (Hz. Suayp), Job (Hz. Eyup), Elijah (Hz. Elyasa) and Abraham (Hz. Ibrahim) lived in this city which in ancient times known as Edessa. Also, Moses (Hz. Musa) lived in the region for seven years working as a shepherd before returning to Egypt with his staff. It was in Sanliurfa that early Christians were first permitted to worship freely and where the first churches were constructed openly. Pagan temples were converted to synagogues, synagogues to churches and churches to mosques, resulting in a uniquely eclectic architecture.

The city’s history is far more complex than mere legendary myths. Known to the ancient Greeks as Orrhoe or Osrhoe, the famous Seleucus Nicator of Antioch, first established the capital of his eastern Hellenistic realm here, populating it with Macedonian veterans who preferred to call it Edessa after their native province. Urfa remained an important garrison town into Roman times and was one of the first centers of the early church, but one given over to the monophysite heresy.

It was at Edessa that the great scientific works of late antiquity were translated with commentaries into Syriac/Aramaic, from whence they made their way into Arabic after the Muslim conquest, only to find their way back to the west following the re-conquest of the city by the Byzantines and then the Crusaders. Under Baldwin I it became the first of several Crusader states in the Middle East.

Credit: : https://www.allaboutturkey.com/urfa.html

18th International Prostate Forum